New Collection: Weeki Wachee Collection

Along with a group of investors, Newton Perry opened Weeki Wachee Springs to the public in October of 1947. At the time, roadside attractions were becoming popular stops along Florida roadways. The attraction consisted of an amalgamation of vendors, an orchid garden, a river boat tour, as well as the star attraction: a mermaid show that took place in an underwater theater. Eventually, the May Museum of the Tropics, an “abandoned Seminole village”, a show called “Birds of Prey”, and a petting zoo were added. After peaking in the 1950s and 1960s, attendance began to decline as theme parks and highways changed the dynamics of Florida’s tourism. The State of Florida took over the attraction as a state park in 2008. Since then, the park has focused on appealing to a modern audience while preserving its history.

Check out our Weeki Wachee Spring Collection:

https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu/omeka/collections/show/63

New Item: A Side Walk with the Art Festival

A Side Walk with the Art Festival by Elizabeth Bradley Bentley. The book celebrates two decades of the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival in Winter Park, Florida. Bentley documents the festival’s history using newspaper articles, oral history interviews, personal experiences, scrapbooks, programs and minutes. Each chapter in Section One represents one year of the festival. Several photographs of prize winning displays are included. Section Two is an appendix of winners, judges, officers, committees, commission and associates.

Debuting in 1960, the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival is one of the nation’s oldest, largest, and most prestigious outdoor art festivals. By 2018, after 60 years, the festival attracted more than 350,000 visitors a year. 225 artists are selected from over 1,000 applicants by a panel of three independent judges. Arts and crafts categories include clay, digital art, drawings and pastels, fiber, glass, graphics and printmaking, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media 2D, mixed media 3D, painting, photography, sculpture, watercolor and wood. The festival incorporates hands-on activities for young children and students to encourage participation in and appreciation of the arts.

You can view this item by clicking on the link below:

https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu/omeka/items/show/10443

New Additions to the Orlando Gay Chorus Collection!

The OGC allowed RICHES to digitize their concert programs going all the way back to their very first performance! Follow the link below to browse through some of the earlier programs and check back soon for more additions!

https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu/omeka/collections/show/206

Watermark Collection Now Through 2006!

Since 1994, The Watermark has been the cornerstone source of LGBTQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer/Questioning, and others) centered news for the Central Florida region. Founded by Tom Dyer in Orlando, the publication began generating bi-weekly issues beginning August 31, 1994. Since then, The Watermark has consistently published newspaper style issues every other Thursday. Gaining traction, the publication expanded in 1995 to include Tampa and, in 1997, The Watermark became a permanent piece of LGBTQ+ culture when the publication initiated the first large-scale Gay Days Weekend event, the Beach Ball at Disney’s Typhoon Lagoon. Before 1999, the publication printed 20,000 copies every week, distributing them to over 500 locations between its two major cities. Following 1999, the publication launched watermarkonline.com shifting to an online publication style. In 2016, Rick Claggett purchased The Watermark.

To explore this collection, please visit: https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu/omeka/collections/show/203

Even More New Additions to the Watermark Collection!

Since 1994, The Watermark has been the cornerstone source of LGBTQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer/Questioning, and others) centered news for the Central Florida region. Founded by Tom Dyer in Orlando, the publication began generating bi-weekly issues beginning August 31, 1994. Since then, The Watermark has consistently published newspaper style issues every other Thursday. Gaining traction, the publication expanded in 1995 to include Tampa and, in 1997, The Watermark became a permanent piece of LGBTQ+ culture when the publication initiated the first large-scale Gay Days Weekend event, the Beach Ball at Disney’s Typhoon Lagoon. Before 1999, the publication printed 20,000 copies every week, distributing them to over 500 locations between its two major cities. Following 1999, the publication launched watermarkonline.com shifting to an online publication style. In 2016, Rick Claggett purchased The Watermark.

To explore this collection, please visit: https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu/omeka/collections/show/203

Happy Holidays from RICHES!

Happy Holidays from all of us at RICHES!

Check out this Army Air Forces menu created for Christmas of 1943, from the private collection of Thomas Cook. The cover shows Santa Claus piloting an airplane over an airbase. There are illustrations of a decorated Christmas tree, a palm tree and what appears to be orange trees.

https://richesmi.cah.ucf.edu/omeka/items/show/1016

New Exhibit: Citizen Curator Project

RICHES includes a permanent archive of Resilience: Remembering Pulse and Pulse: A Consultation, plus five additional projects: Florida Pride and Shame by Amanda Polk; Black in White by Kimari Jackson; Literature for the Resistance by Jaclyn Crawford; Central Florida Pulse: The Tragedy of Place and the Power of Activism by Mia Tangor, Carys O’Neill and Savannah Bitto; and A Cultural Poultice by Abigail Padfield, Debra Fuqua, Kathryn Girvan, and Christopher Foley. These projects were created by undergraduate students enrolled in the School of Visual Arts and Design and graduate students in the Texts and Technology Ph.D. program.
Dr. Connie Lester, Associate Professor of History and Director of RICHES was part of faulty group that taught the Texts and Technology course.
The Citizen Curator Project of Central Florida was made possible by an Institute of Museum and Library Services grant.

Click here to browse the exhibit.